Are You At Risk?

Lisa Cordeiro, RN, CDE

November is National Diabetes Month. Every 21 seconds, someone in the United States is diagnosed with Diabetes. According to the National Diabetes Statistics Report 2017, 30.2 million people in the United States have diabetes and 23% of people with diabetes don’t know they have it.  84.1 million people in the U.S. have prediabetes, which is an abnormal condition of elevated blood sugars that often precedes type 2 diabetes.  A majority of people with prediabetes don’t know they have it!

We spoke with Diabetes Educator, Lisa Cordeiro, RN, CDE, from the Beth Israel Deaconess Diabetes Education Center, to find out more about type 2 diabetes, signs and symptoms, and some risk factors.

Q: what is type 2 diabetes?
Type 2 diabetes is the more common type of diabetes. It is a chronic condition in which the body fails to properly make or use insulin. Insulin is a hormone that helps get glucose into your cells to produce energy. When a person has type 2 diabetes, instead of using that glucose to produce energy, it will back up in the bloodstream and cause a variety of symptoms.

Q: WHat are some symptoms of type 2 diabetes?
Symptoms may not be present at first because type 2 can develop gradually over time. High blood sugar levels can result in symptoms including thirst, frequent urination, tiredness, listlessness, nausea, and dizziness. If the blood sugar levels are extremely high, symptoms may escalate to confusion, drowsiness, and even loss of consciousness.

Q: WHAT ARE SOME risk factors of type 2?
There are numerous risk factors that can lead to type 2. This form of diabetes results when the body doesn’t produce enough insulin and/or is unable to use insulin properly.

  • Having prediabetes (blood sugar levels that are higher than normal but not high enough to be diagnosed as diabetes)
  • Being overweight
  • Being 45 years or older
  • Having a parent, brother, or sister with type 2 diabetes
  • Being physically active less than 3 times a week
  • Ever having gestational diabetes or giving birth to a baby who weighed more than 9 pounds1

Beth Israel Deaconess Hospital-Plymouth’s Diabetes Education Center offers programs to help people living with diabetes live a healthier life.
For more information, call 508-830-2446.

1 https://www.niddk.nih.gov/health-information/diabetes/overview/what-is-diabetes/prediabetes-insulin-resistance

Comments (1)
Posted by: WWareham resident | Nov 15, 2017 09:59

Don't count out Type 1 Diabetes either. I was diagnosed with Type 1 on January 22, 2016 at 49 years old at my yearly physical. T1D is very different then T2 as it's autoimmune and nothing anyone did or can do will stop T1, it's in you from birth but just a matter of when it decides to read havoc on your body and entire life.

 

I would not be here if I didn't go for yearly physicals and many in my age group don't go. My advice is see your doctor regularly, it could save your life.



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